unrelenting.technology

Noticed something on dmesgd… looks like MIPS (64) isn’t that dead: new(ish) Ubiquiti EdgeRouters have newer Octeon processors — quad-core 1GHz (and with an FPU). And 1GB RAM. That’s much better than the Lite’s dual-core 500MHz && 512MB RAM.

…wait, actually, there’s even big 16-cores (and 16GB RAM) in 10G routers!

“header” is a rather unfortunate word overloading in English. Searching for “tpm header” gives you everything about… well, the physical header on mainboards :D Even with “tpm protocol header”, only Google finds something related to protocol specs, and in the lower half of the first page.

I’ve been rewriting the engine that runs this website in the past few months..

and now, finally, unrelenting.technology runs on sweetroll2! Longer writeup coming, this is more of a test post.

AMO front page screenshot, "YouTube boosters" featured section

haha wow my SoundFixer addon is on the addons.mozilla.org front page

Screenshot of LLDB CLI after 'fr sel 0', with keywords 'if' and 'while' hightlighted in green, and number '1' in red

LLVM 8.0 release highlight (ha): LLDB now has syntax highlighting!

Wow! I’ve been thinking about how a WebAssembly runtime in CloudABI would be an awesome “write once, run everywhere” thing… turns out the Cranelift developers are already looking into CloudABI! Awesome!

Cool ARM laptop news that I missed somehow:

The best Cloud-to-Butt replacement I’ve seen yet, thanks to this page:

Butthole was released in 2016 for Firefox to make Buttflare captchas less painful

Looks like NetBSD is already working on the EC2 AArch64 instances! My attempt at running FreeBSD there failed: for mysterious reasons, the system reboots just after the last loader.efi message..

Trying to do anything system-level on EC2 is incredibly frustrating. There is STILL no read-write access to the serial console, because Bezos doesn’t believe in debugging or something >_<

Also, about the ARM instances themselves. I am happy to see a big player enter the ARM space. And with custom (Annapurna) chips, even. (Though they’d have much better performance if they just bought some Ampere eMAGs or Cavium ThunderX2s.)

But what’s up with that price? Did anyone at AWS ever look at Scaleway’s pricing page?! On-demand pricing for a single core EC2 ARM instance is almost 20 bucks per month! While Scaleway offers four ThunderX cores for three euros per month!! Sure sure Scaleway is not a big player and doesn’t have a huge ecosystem and is getting close to being out of stock on these ARM instances.. but still, 1/4 the cores for 5x the price.

(Spot pricing is better of course.)

what’s this? :)