unrelenting.technology

welcome to unrelenting.technology

Hi, I'm Greg, and this is my personal website where I post notes from my adventures in taming computers and software, among other things.

You can interact with posts on this website using your own website, if you set up IndieWeb things on it! (More specifically, sending Webmentions from h-entry formatted post pages.)

Software projects

Waysmoke
Upcoming iced+Wayfire based desktop environment
systemstat
Rust library for gathering system info
sweetroll2
The engine powering this website
soundfixer
Browser extension for fixing bad audio
micro-panel
Entry editor for Micropub-enabled websites
DankBSD
Upcoming rolling release desktop focused FreeBSD variant

Current posts

The touchscreen (both finger and pen support) on my Pixelbook has been broken for a while (the Wacom digitizer was always present on i2c but it wasn’t sending events). There was like one time where I managed to get it to work briefly by holding the pen against it in some way, but that was it. Today I took the laptop out of the bag by the middle part, squeezing the lid a bit. Aaaand… touch works now! Something was going on with wiring somehow inside the lid (not the hinge) I guess? :/

Wi-Fi not connecting (well, getting instantly deauthed due to AP-STA-POSSIBLE-PSK-MISMATCH after connecting) is apparently a relatively common problem with IoT devices. And most people seem to point to ESP8266-based ones.

Well, I’ve never had a problem with ESP, but today I’ve been setting up an RTL8711AF based device (Xiaomi qmi.powerstrip.v1) and it was failing just like that.

Turns out this device just completely fails when 802.11w Management Frame Protection is on (even optionally). Ugh. Thanks Realtek.

Raspberry Pi 4 with the outer metal part of the micro HDMI connector sticking out of the port, micro HDMI adapter with naked pins
Photo parameters4.755 mm ISO 2500 1/10 ƒ/1.65 Download original

Wow. micro HDMI is the worst connector ever.

(well, at least this particular adapter is terrible.. or the Pi 4 grabs too hard?)

Wow, about a month ago Spot (ex-Spotinst), the service that can auto-restore an EC2 spot instance after it gets killed, fixed their arm64 support! (Used to be that it would always set the AMI’s “architecture” metadata to amd64, haha.)

And of course their support didn’t notify me that it was fixed , the service didn’t auto-notify me that an instance finally was successfully restored after months of trying and failing, AWS didn’t notify either (it probably can but I haven’t set anything up?), so I wasted a few bucks running a spare inaccessible clone server of my website. Oh well, at least now I can use a spot instance again without worrying about manual restore.

UPD: hmm, it still tried i386 on another restore! dang it.

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